E-Commerce and the Changing U.S. Industrial Landscape

By 2017, online sales could account for more than one-tenth of all U.S. retail sales. To keep up with growing demand,
e-commerce companies are making major investments in big-box facilities that function both as warehouses to store goods and distribution centers to fulfill online orders. Traditional bricks-and-mortar retailers are shifting inventory held
in the back of stores into big-box centers capable of supporting stores and online order fulfillment. Robust demand for
the limited supply of big-box facilities is reshaping the industrial market, resulting in strong leasing and build-to-suit development, and sparking a new wave of speculative construction.  

 

Q&A: Scott Marshall and Kurt Strasmann on the rapid growth of e-commerce and what it means for the future of the U.S. industrial real estate market.
 
 

What is the state of e-commerce in the U.S.?

Scott Marshall
Executive Managing Director

 

How has e-commerce reshaped the U.S. industrial market?

Kurt Strasmann
Senior Managing Director

 

What are traditional retailers doing to compete with e-commerce firms?

Scott Marshall
Executive Managing Director 

 

How will e-commerce impact U.S. commercial real estate going forward?

Scott Marshall
Executive Managing Director

What opportunities does
e-commerce create for owners and developers of industrial real estate assets?

​Kurt Strasmann
Senior Managing Director

How has e-commerce impacted the Inland Empire market?

Kurt Strasmann
Senior Managing Director